Turandot Shop

Turandot Shop

Italian composer Giacomo Puccini, famous all around the world for having composed the most important operas of Italian lyric landscape in late XIX century- masterpieces as “Madama Butterfly” and “Tosca”- was born in Lucca on 22nd December 1858. The same city where, more than a hundred years afterwards, Marcantonio Lunardi was born. The great Italian composer died in Brussels at the peak of his career, leaving his last and, for someone, his more precious work incomplete: “Turandot”. Marcantonio Lunardi’s reflection on Puccini derives both from their same origins, and from what Puccini has represented and still represents for the Italian culture. In these last twenty years, the Italian art has suffered from a real collapse of style and from horrific attemps of commodification. Quoting the intellectual Salvatore Settis, it should be said that the cultural heritage of every Country must serve firstly the citizens of that Country, and their historical memory. Once understood this, then also the matter of economic management can be faced. However, if we consider the cultural heritage as a useless object, whose only quality is that it can be sold, then it would be better to destroy it. On the one side, in Italy the laws concerning the protection and the improvement of the artistic heritage have been impeded with a severe risk for the conservation of historic testimonies of the Mediterranean civilisation. On the other side, there has been an unscrupulous exploitation of its masterpieces only to sell some more gadgets or sandwhiches. Lunardi, through the work “Turandot Shop”, puts in evidence the problems of his Country and of its ruling class, unable to manage the delicate transition from and art designed for and élite and an art that can be enjoyed also by the masses. The clear reference to Warhol’s work puts in evidence the awkward attempt of a low-quality and partial serialization, where the work by Giacomo Puccini becomes the expression, even though without any easy generalisation, of the inadequacy of a whole class of cultural managers. The transformation undergone by the opera- which must be considered complete only at the end of the degrading process- under the effect of time and nature will compose the metaphor of this self-destructive approach to culture. The corruption of colours, the dissolution of shapes, the decadence of the support will mark this definitive degradation of this ideology of the commodification at every cost, in order to leave room to a more coherent juxtaposition of colours and lines which will create a new balance with nature and with the urban environment in which they will be placed.

Elaborazione grafica

  • Dimensioni: 43cm x 43 cm
  • Technique: digital elaboration
  • edition 20
  • Velvet fine art paper
  • Epson certificated

Stampa